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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm debra norville. >> stephanie: how about you jim? >> i'm katie couric. >> stephanie: what a news day yesterday. poor wolf blitzer. they'll have to leave it there. can you tell his accent from the surveillance video? what how would you be able to tell his accent from his surveillance video? >> were you able to see think pass port from the surveillance video. >> stephanie: the suspect was not arrested in the boston bombing, and he clearly was not darked skinned . oh other than that -- >> if he had been arrested he would have been dark skinned. >> stephanie: you remember hurricane katrina, we have done this with aisha tyler before. this is what happens when anchors have to fill time jim. oh, jack, look at all of those people, so hungry so poor so black. [ laughter ] [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: oh yes he did. it has provided all of the comedy fodder for aisha tyler and her husband, because she says literally at lunch every day she says i'm so hungry so black. [ applause ] >> stephanie: it's like a matinee performance every date their house. and there is a consolation
, and the politico median and author of "the pleat idiot's quite to comedy writing" jim mendrinos. when is it too soon to talk about politics after a tragedy or is it different in every situation. >> i think there are different aspects of politics that can be discussed like barney frank was trying to make a point thank god we have infrastructure. >> john: first responders. >> today perhaps not, but you know,-- >> john: would you agree with me that barney frank kind of crossed the line when he began relating it to the sequester and implied it would have been much worse when it was it's not proven. >> but that's not a question-- >> but newtown, you should be talking about gun control immediately. i'm sorry but yes. >> i think when you're on topic it's never too soon. if you say people with bombs pretty bad people, what can we do to prevent it, let's have that conversation. >> but that's stretching. >> it's not a question of too soon but too ignorant. does your comment have merit? after newtown that was the time to say we need to have sensible gun legislation. the only appropriate reaction to what h
are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk". jim is standing by at the cme in chicago. you've got the numbers. >> the numbers 352. and the claims number 368 on the continuing claims. it's about kind of where it is. the revision from last week up 2,000. so it's right kind of as expected. this was the big number. independent of last week's claims numbers over of last three weeks claims have been a big deal. they have indicated some sort of spring swoon. this is an indication how severe it is going to be. from the looks, it's not that big a deal. stock market up from that. these numbers came out as expected, which is not bad compared to two weeks ago. >> thank you for that. we've got reaction from steve liesman. are the numbers as positive as jim was portraying them? >> it's interesting, andrew. we have yet to see confirmation of that weak jobs report come up in the jobless claims. we have a speak up, some of it. now it has settled down back into that 350,000 range. you would think if it deteriorated as much as it has you would see som
are in the nature of the bomb. >>> up next, abc's senior national correspondent jim avila, shows us just how far the blast from the bombs traveled. >> reporter: the killer bombs likely contained less than two pounds of common black powder explosive, says one of the nations leading ied experts. even leaving the characteristic white smoke. bombs designed to spread terror and death with a lethal blast of metal shrapnel. >> looks like he was out to kill and maim. >> reporter: hold it right there. here we see windows blown out here, but the buildings themselves are intact. what does that tell us about what this bomber wanted to do? >> that he did not want to take down the building. that wasn't his main target. it was to disrupt the marathon and kill people in that immediate area. >> reporter: houston says this is classic ied design, the kill zone from the blast, one to two yards. according to the accounts from the bomb's site, powerful enough to knock a runner off his feet ten yards away. and topple another man on his couch from the third floor of the building next door, 20 yards away. >> it looks li
has now been canceled. clearly there is internal debate. jim walsh is a international security analyst. he calls boston home and, jim, good morning to you. >> good morning. bill: just the sense of debate that is quite clear what you put out and what you don't, what do you believe about that? >> i think there are a couple of considerations law enforcement is looking at. you don't want to put out a photo if in some way that tells the culprit or suspect something that enables them, makes it more difficult for them to find. you don't want to tip them off if you don't have to. particularly with the fbi some sense of the richard jewell episode that still hangs over their heads. just because you have a suspect that doesn't mean they're guilty. by releasing the photo you increase the pressure, the public will look for the person. think i they want to get their you can it is in a row before they go public with it. we're seeing something we have never seen before, bill as i went on facebook, crowd sourcing which can be a powerful in a positive way and in a negative way. bill: what is crowd sourc
. >> chris? >> thank you very much. i'm here talking with steven and jim. you're there, you were there to help the elite athletes, thinking you're going to deal with cramps and dehydration. what happened, steven? >> the first thing we heard was the explosion, then we felt the concussion in the room. then several of us went running towards the front door. then we heard the second explosion, and then two or three of us kept going. and then the group kept going back, waiting for the casualties. so half of us went forward to the wounded and half stayed back. >> jim, what do you see when you get to the casualties? >> lots of smoke and confusion, lots of blood. lots of injured patients. for me, it was just a flashback to iraq. carrying that first explosion, i knew it was an ied. usually they come in twos, sometimes threes. sometimes they wait for people to come out and they set off the third one or the second one. there were two. they stopped the third one, thankfully. and we had to make room in the medical tent from the athletes, the marathoners, to move forward to make room for the i
dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. don't blame him. instead, rely on frontline plus. it kills adult fleas and ticks, plus flea eggs and larvae, destroying future generations. ask your vet about frontline plus. >> now from abc7 news, good morning, breaking news on a haz-mat situation in the south
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
tsavraev, at the request of the russian government. cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta joins us from washington now with what's going on. a lot of frustration, a lot of what ifs, could if this boston magnificent y massacre been prevented? those are the questions that will be brought forward today. >> that's right, wolf. it will be playing out on capitol hill. the senate intelligence committee has set a hearing for 2:30 this afternoon with fbi officials, they will be the lead briefers at this hearing. i'm told from a source of that committee. lawmakers want to find out if federal investigators somehow failed to see big red flags coming from tamerlan tsavraev. as lawmakers are praising authorities for the quick work in the boston bombing case, members of congress are still calling for hearings, into the fbi's handling of dead suspect tamerlan tsavraev, who traveled back to a dangerous region of russia, just last year. >> what did he do, when he went back for six months? sit in his aunt and uncle's home for six months or doing something else? and when he came back to this countr
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
who can't talk? hostage negotiator jim cavanagh is back with us next. ♪ good time never seemed so good ♪ what do you think? that's great. it won't take long, will it? nah. okay. this, won't take long will it? no, not at all. how many of these can we do on our budget? more than you think. didn't take very long, did it? this spring, dig in and save. that's nice. post it. already did. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. dig in and save with vigoro one-quart annuals, four for just ten bucks. >>> the interrogation of dzhokhar tsarnaev is underway but not necessarily as planned. right now the surviving marathon bombing suspect lies underguard at a boston hospital. he is answering questions in writing because of a throat wound. possibly from a suicide attempt friday night, it tough for him to talk. there is no word on what information he may be giving investigators about the plot or the attack. in the past few days, interesting details have emerged about how dzhokhar spend his day on campus at the university of massachusetts dartmouth right after the bombing. going
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
went off. former atf bomb investigator jim cavanaugh says it's obvious. >> large injuries were on the side of it, debris field to the left. some protected areas over on the right side that indicate the blast was to the one side of the trash receptacle. this was the scene of the blast. >> the fbi is considering publicly showing the pictures of the men they're looking for, and may do so later at a news conference today. >> pete, thank you very much. >>> drenching rain overnight in chicago. al? >> there are states of emergency throughout much of northern illinois into central illinois, because of the flooding they've gotten, the dan ryan expressway. it's a real mess there. chicago o'hare airport picking up over 4 inches of rain in the last 3 hours. in fact, airport reporting the terminal has actually had water on the floor. it's been flooding in there. still more heavy rain making its way through chicago today. it's going to continue to come down. we have flawed flood warnings much through missouri and illinois, and we're also looking for rainfall amounts anyway anyway to what the
. >> now the man you saw standing next to steve, his name is jim. he actually was a trauma nurse in iraq for 18 months. and he said all of those skills that he learned in iraq he used yesterday in boston. john? >> they treated scores of people. they saved, no doubt, scores of people. but they also, elizabeth, watched people die. >> they did. they did watch people die. and so steve who we just heard from, he told me the story one of the first patients he worked on was a young woman. he remembers her, blonde hair, blue eyes, maybe about 20 years old. sh came in and, you know, her leg was broken. her abdomen was open due to the explosion. she wasn't breathing. they gave her cpr. they tried over and over again. they just didn't have a pulse. he said when they were treating her after she passed away, they looked around for some kind of identification in her pockets but he said as far as he knew they just didn't know -- still couldn't figure out who she was. >> so sad. as we said, there are a number of people still in the hospital this morning. 17 in critical condition, 20 in serious condition
is a conservative republican, a former democratic member of congress jim jones and this study, this group looked at the question of torture and came to some amazing conclusions. number one, they said there is no doubt, no doubt, that the united states engaged in the practice of torture under the bush administration. this is just under george bush and dick cheney, number 1. we did engage in torture. it was illegal. it was against international law. number 3, we did it even though there is no firm or persuasive evidence, reading from the report, that they produced any valuable information or any information that we could not have gotten through other means, zero evidence of anything out of that torture. and he engaging in torture, from the bi-partisan report quote, damaged the standing of our nation reducedour capacity to enact moral 7censure and increased the danger to u.s. military personnel taken captive. we did it. it was illegal, we got nothing out of it. we damaged our standing, we made our own military -- put our own military more at risk and more in danger
at the beginning of the iraq war map. jim asked me does this still hold true today? to movie stars need to be afraid to speak out and i would say yes. the lesson is if you care about your pocketbook come if you want to speak and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong you'll never get in trouble but if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you believe as a citizen we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everyone from the beginning white, male. since then we've expanded. i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who is sovereign, the american people declared it rather than a king or queen. you couldn't of a king or queen taking your land away because they had given it to use your sovereign rights of everyone has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government we should expect that and yet at the beginning of the iraq war map when they spoke out against the war they had their invitation to talk to the baseball hall of fame and right after that i had a crew from fox news come to my hous
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)